Please visit our new website at www.export.gov!

Healthcare Resource Guide: Peru

Peru Statistics

Summary

Market Entry

Current Market Trends

Main Competitors

Current Demand

Registration Process

Barriers

Trade Events

CS Contacts

Best Prospects

Capital: Lima

Population: 30.7 million (2016)

GDP*: USD $189.1 billion (2016)

Currency: Peruvian Nuevo Sol

Language: Spanish

Summary

Peru's healthcare sector is expected to grow 8.6% from 2014-2019, up from 7.6% in 2009-2014. This is fueled by strong economic growth, and a pro-investment government led by newly-elected President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski. The Ministry of Health (MINSA- Ministerio de Salud) expects the country to reach universal health coverage by 2021.

The Peruvian healthcare sector is comprised of five core decentralized entities, four public and one private, each with its own separate facilities. First, the Ministry of Health's health insurance program, Seguro Integral de Salud, is the largest insurance provider covering 60% of the population. Second, the Ministry of Labor's social security program, EsSalud covers those in the formal economy, or 30% of the population. The remaining 10% of the population receives services from the Armed Forces, National Police and the private sector. As of December 2015, more than 80% of the population had some type of insurance, up from 63.5% in 2010.

Peru is the eighth most populous country in the Americas region with a population of 30.7 million inhabitants and an average life expectancy of 73.7 years. According to the World Bank, Peru’s annual health expenditures in 2015 were approximately USD 10.7 billion, equal to 5.5% of GDP and USD 358 per capita, lower than most other Latin American countries. In May of 2008, the government passed the Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) legislative decree, which aims at facilitating the private investment promotion process through the creation, development, improvement, operation and maintenance of public infrastructure or the provision of public services. One example of a successful partnership is EsSalud's inauguration of two PPP hospitals. They will continue to build new hospitals under this process. Also in 2008, the government enacted the Works for Taxes law (Obras por Impuestos). In accordance with this law, a private company may finance and implement public projects chosen by regional and local governments, then deduct the investment amount from its income tax.

Market Entry

Since the U.S.-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement (PTPA) came into force in 2009, the majority of medical devices/equipment and pharmaceuticals enter Peru duty-free, provided a U.S. certificate of origin is presented to Peruvian customs.

U.S. companies must register their products in Peru by partnering with a local distributor who has the ability to register through the Dirección General de Medicamentos, Drogas e Insumos (DIGEMID). Aside from obligatory registration, working with a local distributor is beneficial due to Peruvian preferences to buy locally from someone who can provide after-sales services. U.S. manufacturers should maintain close contact with end-users and provide training and demonstrations so that they can familiarize themselves with the equipment.

To succeed in the Peruvian market, U.S. firms should offer competitive pricing. Modern technology with strong post-sales technical and parts support is well received. All marketing materials and product information should be provided in Spanish.

In addition, U.S. firms are encouraged to take advantage of trade missions to Peru in order to promote new products. Attending trade events relevant to the industry is another proven method to test the local market or promote new U.S. products.

Current Market Trends

About 2.1 million people, or 6.8% of the total population, in Peru are 65 or older. There is a demand for quality elder care and treatment for cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. In addition, the rising middle class in and around Lima has led to an increase in the urban population with higher expectations from their healthcare providers and who are willing to pay for it.

In stark contrast to the public system, the private health care sector has been particularly dynamic, having experienced significant growth in the past five years buoyed by rising insurance penetration rates. Private investment in the sector peaked in 2014, reaching USD 400 million and adding some 1,100 hospital beds. The outlook for the private health care market is positive. However, the future of the healthcare industry is reliant on central and regional government investment. An important component of the reform package introduced in late 2013 by MINSA was the launch of a USD 2.7 billion program to reduce the considerable gap. Indicative of the government’s commitment to reform, the health care budget more than doubled the amount originally committed, surpassing USD 4.3 billion in 2016. The program aims to modernize existing medical infrastructure, as well as build new additions. It is expected to add 7,000 new hospital beds and includes rehabilitation, construction and equipment of 206 primary care centers, construction of 170 provincial hospitals, construction of 23 regional hospitals and construction of 13 national hospitals.

The government's increasingly assertive stance towards prioritizing and enhancing the country's healthcare system plus the interest of private companies to invest more in state of the art equipment such as computed tomography (CT) scanners, robotic radiosurgery systems and gamma knives, will yield opportunities for foreign medical device manufacturers. These opportunities are augmented by the country's low export profile, where local manufacturing is limited to consumables, basic electro diagnostics and hospital furniture.

Telemedicine is growing, led by EsSalud’s inauguration of the Telemedicine Center in 2014. The project was made possible through the acquisition of hardware and software to allow storage and release of radiological images of 32 centers throughout the country, as well as expanding bandwidth in the various provincial offices for telemedicine, teleradiology and teleconsultation with an investment of more than US$12.5 million. EsSalud is in the process of acquiring 82 specialized workstations to expand service nationwide.

Main Competitors

Peru has limited manufacturing capacity and relies heavily on imports. The United States is the largest exporter of healthcare goods and services to Peru at 21.7% market share. China is not far behind at 18.1%, followed by Germany, Japan, South Korea, and Brazil. Local buyers view U.S. products as having higher quality and reliability than most competitors.

Current Demand

Demand exceeds capacity in Peru for healthcare services. Following years of underinvestment, the Peruvian public healthcare system is in significant need of facilities and trained personnel. EY Peru estimates the healthcare infrastructure gap to reach USD 18.9 billion from 2016-2025, including estimated needs of at least 5,000 additional hospital beds, 16,000 doctors and an acute need for additional specialty hospitals. In addition, a growing middle class is demanding increased medical care and better quality services. The Peruvian government’s USD 2.7 billion investment, administered by MINSA beginning in 2013, is meant to close this gap, presenting an opportunity for U.S. healthcare exporters. EsSalud’s planned construction of additional PPP hospitals provides additional opportunities to U.S. exporters.

Registration Process

To sell medical equipment and devices a sanitary registry is required. The Ministry of Health through the Dirección General de Medicamentos, Drogas e Insumos (DIGEMID) is the healthcare authority that regulates the importation of medical equipment and devices. It is mandatory to name a local distributor or representative since the registration will be issued to the Peruvian company. Public and private hospitals purchase new medical equipment. Used medical equipment is only permitted for individual physicians buying their equipment for their own use. For more information on product registration, please refer to DIGEMID’s website: http://www.digemid.minsa.gob.pe/.

Barriers

Overall, Peru has the second smallest market in the Americas region. An inefficient and fragmented public health system poses a challenge to the growth of the sector in Peru. The private healthcare sector is small, yet growing. Peru has low per capita health expenditure and planned infrastructure projects are often delayed.

Trade Events

Tecnosalud 2017 September 6-8, 2017 (Jockey Expositions Center, Lima, Peru)

International healthcare goods and services tradeshow http://www.tecnosalud.com.pe/en/

Local Associations

General Directorate of Environmental Health: http://www.digesa.minsa.gob.pe/

Ministry of Health: http://www.minsa.gob.pe

ProInvestment: http://www.proinversion.gob.pe/english

Projects for Taxes: http://www.obrasporimpuestos.pe

Medical College of Peru: http://cmp.org.pe/

Peru Dental College: http://www.cop.org.pe/

Government Links:

Healthcare Procurement: http://www.digemid.minsa.gob.pe/

http://www.proinversion.gob.pe/

Government Health Plans: http://www.minsa.gob.pe/

http://www.essalud.gob.pe/

U.S. Commercial Service Contact Information

Name: Gustavo Romero Díaz

Position: Commercial Specialist

Email: gustavo.romero@trade.gov 

Phone: +51 1 618 2671

Best Prospects

  • Medical, surgical and dental instruments
  • Needles and catheters
  • Artificial joints, parts and accessories
  • Ophthalmic instruments, appliances, and parts
  • X-ray apparatus
  • Electro-diagnostic apparatus and parts
  • Adhesive dressings
  • Orthopedic or fracture appliances and parts
  • Respiration apparatus

The Peruvian healthcare market is predicted to experience moderate growth in the next few years, driven by government programs to establish a “new care standard.” The USD 2.7 billion government medical reform package launched in 2013 is an opportunity for U.S. exporters to provide construction, equipment and training. It is expected that the new government, led by Pedro Pablo Kuczynski, will continue investing in key healthcare programs.


  Notice to Visitors!


  The link you have chosen will take you to a non-U.S. Government website.

  If the page does not appear in 5 seconds, please click this: outside web site

  Export.gov is managed by the International Trade Administration and external links are covered by its website  disclaimer statement.


  Notice to Visitors!


  The link you have chosen will take you to a non-U.S. Government website.

  If the page does not appear in 5 seconds, please click this: outside web site

  BuyUSA.gov is managed by the International Trade Administration and external links are covered by its website disclaimer statement.