invites you to join us for on Friday, September 28th for


featuring

Bryan Burke

Foreign Service Officer
U.S. Embassy – La Paz, Bolivia

1. The Bolivian economy is still growing at an average of 4%

2. American products are well received in Bolivia

3. Bolivia is rich in non-renewable natural resources, including the world’s largest untapped lithium reserves

4. Bolivia’s agriculture sector will grow in the next ten years.

5. The Bolivian government wants to promote Foreign Direct Investment (FDI).

Agricultural Pesticides/Herbicides, Machinery & Related Technologies: Bolivia does not produce agriculture machinery. Bolivia imports most machinery from the United States, China, Argentina and Brazil. Most commercial agriculture (farms operating on 50-5000 hectares) is carried out in the department of Santa Cruz, in the eastern lowlands of Bolivia. Agriculture in the western highlands is mainly carried out by small farmers (50 hectares or less). Although agriculture is more developed and mechanized in Santa Cruz, the use of modern agriculture technologies in Santa Cruz and in Bolivia in general is very restricted. When compared with other countries, Bolivian agriculture yields are among the lowest in the region. Farmers and the Bolivian government are attempting to improve the Bolivian agriculture sector and increase agricultural yields.

Electricity: The best sales prospects in the electricity sector include machinery (mainly thermo and hydro turbines), equipment, and other technology for thermoelectric and hydroelectric projects. Products related to renewables, including solar and wind, may also find a market in Bolivia.

Healthcare: The Bolivian government prioritizes that all citizens have access to proper health services and medicines. Bolivia does not produce medical equipment and products and only produces a limited amount of pharmaceutical products, needs to import medical devices and pharmaceuticals to meet demand. Multiple companies exist whose sole function is to import medical equipment to Bolivia. Lastly, multiple hospitals have approached the Embassy to express interest in buying American medical equipment.

Hydrocarbons: The best sales prospects in hydrocarbons are natural gas-related machinery, equipment, and production techniques. Several U.S. companies have been successful selling supporting machinery and equipment to Bolivia.

Mining: Mining remains one of Bolivia’s most important economic activities. Despite more than 500 years of continuous mining in Bolivia, estimates suggest that only 10% of Bolivia’s mineral resources have been extracted. Principal metals and industrial minerals include gold, silver, zinc, lead, tin, copper, tungsten, sulfur, potassium, lithium, borax, and semi-precious stones. Mining accounts for approximately 26% of Bolivia’s exports or $1.9 billion in 2016. There is one large U.S. firm operating a major silver mine in Potosi.

Bolivia is looking to capitalize on its large in-ground lithium supply, the largest lithium deposits of any country and its deposits are estimated to be about half of the world's supply. The government released a tender for a lithium plant which could be a business opportunity for U.S. technology and equipment suppliers.

Road Vehicles: Much of the new growth is in personal vehicles and trucks, but there is also increased interest in buses, and other heavy vehicles. As of December 31, 2014, the government only authorizes the importation of vehicles one year old or newer. This means that the Bolivian fleet is extremely divided between brand new vehicles and significantly older ones.

Sub-Sector Best Prospects: Cars, trucks, and buses and their associated maintenance equipment and spare parts are all markets that are growing.

Location:
U.S. Commercial Service – Orange County
2302 Martin St. Suite 315
Irvine, CA 92612

Date:
Friday, September 28th

Agenda:

7:30-8:00am Check-in/breakfast/networking
8:00-8:40am Bolivia brief
8:40-9:00am Open Q&A
9:00-9:30am Networking
9:30am Program ends; one-on-one meetings begin

Fee:
$20

Questions? Contact Tatyana.Aguirre@trade.gov

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